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Scottish schools ban Fatherís Day cards

Fear of embarrassing children of single mothers or lesbians prompts move

Father as the disposable parent?!!

Thousands of primary pupils were prevented from making Father's Day cards at school for fear of embarrassing classmates who live with single mothers and lesbians. The politically correct policy was quietly adopted at schools "in the interests of sensitivity" over the growing number of lone-parent and same-sex households.


The perpetrators of separation and alienation do not want children contemplating the causes and perpetrators of their separation from their fathers.

The making of Mother's Day cards and crafts, in the run-up to Mothering Sunday, remains generally permitted.


NB. Father's Day in the northern hemisphere was on Sunday 15 June 2008.

Father's Day Card - I Love My Daddy

Father's Day cards banned in Scottish schools

The Telegraph
22 June 2008

Father's Day cards banned in Scottish schools
By Simon Johnson, Scottish Political Editor

Thousands of primary pupils were prevented from making Father's Day cards at school for fear of embarrassing classmates who live with single mothers and lesbians.

The politically correct policy was quietly adopted at schools "in the interests of sensitivity" over the growing number of lone-parent and same-sex households.

It only emerged after a large number of fathers failed to receive their traditional cards and handmade gifts.

Family rights campaigners last night condemned the policy as "absurd" and argued that it is marginalising fathers, but local authorities said teachers need to react to "the changing pattern of family life".

An Office for National Statistics report in April found that one in four British children now lives with a lone parent - double the figure 20 years ago.

The Father's Day card ban has been introduced by schools in Glasgow, Edinburgh, East Renfrewshire, Dumfries and Galloway and Clackmannshire.

Tina Woolnough, 45, whose son Felix attends Edinburgh's Blackhall primary school, said several teachers there had not allowed children to make Father's Day cards this year.

Mrs Woolnough, a member of the school's parent-teacher council, said: "This is something I know they do on a class-by-class basis at my son Felix's school. Some classes send Father's Day cards and some do not.

"The teachers are aware of the family circumstances of the children in each class and if a child hasn't got a father living at home, the teacher will avoid getting the children to make a card."

The making of Mother's Day cards and crafts, in the run-up to Mothering Sunday, remains generally permitted.

But the Father's Day edict follows a series of other politically correct measures introduced in primary schools, including the removal of Christian references from festive greetings cards.

Matt O'Connor, founder of campaign group Fathers For Justice, said: "I'm astonished at this. It totally undermines the role and significance of fathers whether they are still with the child's mother or not.

"It also sends out a troubling message to young boys that fathers aren't important."

Alastair Noble, education officer with the charity Christian Action, Research and Education, said: "This seems to be an extreme and somewhat absurd reaction.

"I would have thought that the traditional family and marriage are still the majority lifestyles of people in Scotland. To deny the experience of the majority just does not seem sensible."

Local authorities defended the change, saying teachers needed to act "sensitively" at a time when many children were experiencing family breakdown and divorce.

A spokesman for East Renfrewshire Council said: "Increasingly, it is the case that there are children who haven't got fathers or haven't got fathers living with them and teachers are having to be sensitive about this.

"Teachers have always had to deal with some pupils not having fathers or mothers, but with marital breakdown it is accelerating."

Jim Goodall, head of education at Clackmannanshire Council, said teachers are expected to behave with common sense but be sensitive to "the changing pattern of family life."

South Ayrshire Council said children should not feel left out or unwanted, while City of Edinburgh Council said the practice on Father's Day cards was a matter for individual schools.


Scottish schools ban Father's Day cards

The Sunday Times
22 June 2008

Scottish schools ban Father's Day cards
Fear of embarrassing children of single mothers or lesbians prompts move
By Kathleen Nutt

Christian references have been removed from Christmas cards and school sports days excised of competitiveness. Now Father's Day has become the latest event to fall victim to the forces of political correctness.

Last week thousands of children were prevented from making Father's Day cards at school to avoid causing embarrassment to classmates who live with single mothers and lesbian couples.

The politically correct policy in the interests of "sensitivity" over the growing number of lone-parent and same-sex households, has been quietly adopted by schools across Scotland.

It only emerged this year after a large number of fathers failed to receive their traditional cards and gifts last Sunday.

While primary children are banned from making cards for their fathers, few schools impose similar restrictions in the run up to Mothering Sunday.

The ban has been introduced by schools in Glasgow, Edinburgh, East Renfrewshire, Dumfries and Galloway and Clackmannanshire.

Currently, some 280,000 children in Scotland live in single parent households, accounting for just 7% of the total.

Tina Woolnough, 45, from Edinburgh, whose son Felix attends Blackhall primary, said a number of teachers at the school had not allowed children to make Father's Day cards this year.

"This is something I know they do on a class-by-class basis at my son Felix's school," said Woolnough, who is a member of the school's parent-teacher council. Some classes send Father's Day cards and some do not.

"The teachers are aware of the family circumstances of the children in each class and if a child hasn't got a father living at home, the teacher will avoid getting the children to make a card."

Family rights campaigners have condemned the policy as "absurd" and claimed it is marginalising fathers.

"I'm astonished at this, it totally undermines the role and significance of fathers whether they are still with the child's mother or not," said Matt O'Connor, founder of Fathers For Justice. "It also sends out a troubling message to young boys that fathers aren't important."

Alastair Noble, education officer with the charity Christian Action, Research and Education, added: "This seems to be an extreme and somewhat absurd reaction. I would have thought that the traditional family and marriage are still the majority lifestyles of people in Scotland. To deny the experience of the majority just does not seem sensible."

Victoria Gillick, the family values campaigner, accused schools of politicising a traditional fun activity for children.

"Children like making things, and making things for someone is great fun. I wouldn't call it politically correct, I'd just call it stupid," she said.

"It seems quite unfair to deny those children whose parents are together and who want to make cards from enjoying the experience. Stopping children from making Father's Day cards is reinforcing the fact that some fathers are not there, it's actually drawing attention to the issue."

Local authorities defended the move, saying teachers needed to act sensitively at a time when many children were experiencing family breakdown and divorce.

"Increasingly, it is the case that there are children who haven't got fathers or haven't got fathers living with them and teachers are having to be sensitive about this," said a spokesman for East Renfrewshire council. "Teachers have always had to deal with some pupils not having fathers or mothers, but with marital breakdown it is accelerating."

Jim Goodall, head of education at Clackmannanshire council, said: "We expect teachers and headteachers to apply their professional skills and behave in a common sense manner. They have to be sensitive to the appropriate use of class time and the changing pattern of family life. We trust our staff to act sensibly and sensitively."

A spokesman for South Ayrshire council said: "We are aware of the sensitivities of the issue and wouldn't do anything that would make any child feel left out or unwanted in any way."

Edinburgh city council said the practice on Father's Day cards was a matter for individual schools.

Have Your Say

"Currently, some 280,000 children in Scotland live in single parent households, accounting for just 7% of the total."

Oh, I see. The minority rule now??? It is the homosexual community and same-sex "marriages" that "legally" ensure that children are deprived from birth of either a mom or dad.

Scia, Springfield, USA

…….

Why do we have to avoid offending the lesbians, but not avoid offending the fathers?

What about the increasing number of household with male single parents? Why aren't Mother's day cards banned for the "benefit" of those families too?

We should celebrate mothers and fathers equally or not at all.

John Kimble, Southampton,

…….

Why should 'marital breakdown' stop children making their dads a card? He's separated, not dead! This is symptomatic of how separated fathers are systematically and deliberately amputated from their children's lives by state institutions.

David Space, London, UK

I wonder if the gays and lesbians have something to do with this?

 O_o  Why opt to not make cards? Make the blessed cards, let kids with Dad's enjoy the activity. Those that don't have a Dad could be encouraged to make "another" special card for Mum or be allowed to make one "for my other mum" if the parents are in a same sex relationship.  Geez, it's not that hard is it?

Junior Executive of SRL-Resources

Executive Member of SRL-Resources, the Family Law People on this site (Look for the Avatars). Be mindful what you post in public areas. 
That's a real shame you missed out on that encouragement.

My kids do a father's day card at school and another at after school. Dad gets one and Mum and Orion get the other one. They show us both, so we can comment on their colouring in and so forth.

My kids are very fair.

Junior Executive of SRL-Resources

Executive Member of SRL-Resources, the Family Law People on this site (Look for the Avatars). Be mindful what you post in public areas. 
monster said
no toys
no nice clothes
no sports
no outside activites
no freinds
no phone
no father (ok not her fault)

Hey you forgot to add
 
no CAPITAL letters

to your list

Sometimes my daughter may be at her mums leading up to Fathersday and may forget the card or hand made prezzy so she'll get the craft stuff out and make one for me.
Funny thing is on mothers day we spend the week making cards, doing drawing and making presents, we have fun because we share the time and make an effort.

I can't see why they can't put a spin on things and get kids without dads in their lives to just make a parents day card for their parent.

Sound a bit like political crapness
Political Crapness (Look Ma lots of caps…) I love that expression.

Anyway it is ridiculous if kids can't do anything nice for a parent missing or not. What's wrong with making a fathers day card OR a card for a significant male figure or someone else you want to show your appreciation for? Kids are smart - they figure it out.

Funny how a few years ago it was hate all gays, muslims, etc etc and now it has become the exact opposite instead of aiming for a balance of tolerance for all groups wether they are a minority, majority or an equalority. (New word cos it looks apt)

When you are swimming down a creek and an eel bites your cheek, that's a Moray.
How long will it be before all pupils are forced to wear attire that won't remind these poor soles that they aren't something, in fact how long before they just simply ban children for the sake of those who can't have them?
C'mon Mike that not what their after there just after repressing mankind.

I wonder if the gay couple who have adopted get two cards on mothers day seeing as they can't get one on fathers day.

I thought father Christmas would be the first to go.

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