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(Britain) Fatherless families are a new underclass living off taxpayers

Three generation extended families without men are creating a new underclass, says report

The institute concluded: "It is the loss and waste of male resources which is the basic flaw in extended families without men. The women in these new families are not the sort who want to take over male roles. So they generate a serious and growing deficit, which can only be balanced in wider society insofar as members of conventional families do more than their fair share. New class conflicts are brewing here."

Fatherless families are a new underclass living off taxpayers

The Telegraph (Britain)
4 March 2010

Three generation extended families without men are creating a new underclass, says report
Single parent families without a man in the house for three generations are creating a new underclass, a study has warned.
By Laura Roberts

The research into extended families in Britain by the Centre for Policy Studies, found that increasing numbers of single mothers are the product of a single parent family themselves.

It concluded that the absence of male influence made this type of "lone mother family" more likely to rely on the welfare state as an "indispensable prop" and even lead to "new class conflict".

This male-free "subculture" revolves around "caring for children, and seems to involve little paid work by mothers or grandmothers" said the report. "Such a development heralds the development of an underclass dependent for material support on the rest of society… Three-generation extended families without men have arrived."

Figures show there is a "growing tendency" for lone mothers to have daughters who go on to become lone mothers themselves.

In 1998 44 per cent of maternal grandmothers who were single mothers had daughters who were also lone parents. By 2008 53 per cent of maternal grandmothers had daughters who, like them, were single mothers.

The report said that these families had lower rates of working than families with partners making them more likely to rely on benefits.

"This new type of extended family seems liable to become very inward-looking, and in the last analysis be parasitic on the rest of society with more conventional families", it claimed.

The institute concluded: "It is the loss and waste of male resources which is the basic flaw in extended families without men. The women in these new families are not the sort who want to take over male roles. So they generate a serious and growing deficit, which can only be balanced in wider society insofar as members of conventional families do more than their fair share. New class conflicts are brewing here."

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