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(Britain) A divorce deal that shames women

The High Court's award of a 215,000 divorce payout to a former wife - 25 years after the couple split - is a blow to those who believe that women are equal to men.

The High Court's award of a 215,000 divorce payout to the former wife of a leading barrister - 25 years after the couple split - is a terrible blow to those who rightly believe that women are equal to men. Philippa Vaughan, 66, has no children, lives in a four-bedroom 1million house in fashionable Hammersmith, West London, and inherited 770,000 from her parents. But she still convinced the judge to award her the extra lump sum. He said it was 'plainly wrong' to think she could adjust to life after her ex-husband's maintenance payments were cancelled last year.
By any yardstick this was an unjust claim. Particularly since her ex-husband had accrued most of his wealth AFTER they split and during his second marriage.
Is it any wonder that surveys suggest that 20 per cent of girls don't want a career, but, like footballers' WAGs, simply want to hitch on to a rich man? It's also not surprising if young men are reluctant to get married. They fear that if they divorce, they could face financial ruin. As a result, marriage rates are at the lowest since records began in 1862.

This is NOT EQUALITY, It's ENTITLEMENT

Daily Mail (Britain)
3 April 2010

A divorce deal that shames women
By Amanda Platell

The High Court's award of a 215,000 divorce payout to the former wife of a leading barrister - 25 years after the couple split - is a terrible blow to those who rightly believe that women are equal to men.

Philippa Vaughan, 66, has no children, lives in a four-bedroom 1million house in fashionable Hammersmith, West London, and inherited 770,000 from her parents.

But she still convinced the judge to award her the extra lump sum. He said it was 'plainly wrong' to think she could adjust to life after her ex-husband's maintenance payments were cancelled last year.

In this case, the absurdity of Mrs Vaughan's divorce claim is exposed by the fact that as a working woman (with a job as an expert in Islamic and Indian art), she was able to earn her own living.

By any yardstick this was an unjust claim. Particularly since her ex-husband had accrued most of his wealth AFTER they split and during his second marriage.

It seems Mrs Vaughan's main concern was to get one over her ex - rather than any interest in justice. So once again our crazy divorce laws, which too often encourage women to sponge off men, have delivered another hammer blow against the institution of marriage.

Any divorce lawyer will tell you that such high-profile court awards have a profound effect on women's attitudes to marriage and divorce - especially with regard to the values of young women.

Is it any wonder that surveys suggest that 20 per cent of girls don't want a career, but, like footballers' WAGs, simply want to hitch on to a rich man?

It's also not surprising if young men are reluctant to get married. They fear that if they divorce, they could face financial ruin. As a result, marriage rates are at the lowest since records began in 1862.

Britain's divorce laws need to be changed to recognise how much women's roles in society have altered - mainly for the better - and to stop grasping ladies of leisure, or wives who earn good salaries, from leeching off men.

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