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Babies and Toddlers RESEARCH

Research

DADS on THE AIR
Familists VFeminists Date
Tuesday, February 7, 2012


 


Kip Miller is a fathers rights activist who is described by Lord Justice Thorpe of the UK Family Division as having a history of responsible campaigning and writing on issues relating to family relationships. He holds a Postgraduate Certificate in Research Methods and is trained in Child Psychology and Child Sociology with a Teachers' Certificate and Masters Degree.

The author of even Toddlers Need Fathers joins us today from Southampton in the UK. Kip Miller wrote to the Australian Attorney-General Nicola Roxon on 16 January 2012 with the support of the Shared Parenting Council of Australia about particular concerns with the contribution to Australian law making of Psychologist Dr Jennifer McIntosh.

Jennifer McIntosh has been trying to influence Australian lawmakers and even those of some other countries including the UK and Israel to adopt the theories of Dr John Bowlby dating from 1951. In his theory of attachment he called 'maternal deprivation' Bowlby links mothering to the state of mental health in children. The faulty understanding of the theory leads to some odd conclusions such as that a child under two years old who sleeps overnight in her fathers home is going to be harmed in some way by the experience, although it is OK to sleep there during the day.

Kip Miller brings real expertise and the wisdom of the world leaders in this area of research as a welcome respite from the feminist twaddle that passes itself off as an authoritative voice.


WEBPAGE - http://www.dadsontheair.com.au/shows/familists-v-feminists.html

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW - AFTER 7mins 30secs - http://www.dadsontheair.com.au/storage/shows/Dads_on_the_Air_2012-02-07.mp3

WEBSITE BIOGRAPHY

Kingsley Miller is a fathers' rights activist with a "history of responsible campaigning and writing on issues relating to family relationships". (Lord Justice Thorpe, Vice President of the UK Family Division, 30 July 2004). He has a Postgraduate Certificate in Research Methods and is trained in Child Psychology and Child Sociology with a Teachers' Certificate and a Masters Degree. His own research focused on the environmental factors that influence 'league tables' in education. He has produced 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in UK family courts which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an 'interesting and informative guide'. The former Home Secretary, and father, David Blunkett, said 'I am very grateful to all those, like yourself who have written and particularly where you have been able to demonstrate your own thinking from the experiences you have had. Congratulations on your battle'. His two YouTUBE Channels have had over 800,000 views. (The photograph was taken on the occasion of the 2010 Debate on Fatherhood held at the Houses of Parliament).

ALL,

I have taken the unusual step of posting my own biography from my website to avoid any confusion because I have received (Friday, 10 February 2012, 0:32 LONDON TIME) the following e-mail from another contributor APRIL on this forum;

kip

Kingsley Miller is the author of 'even Toddlers Need Fathers', a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in family courts, which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an, 'interesting and informative guide'. He has also received a letter from Buckingham Palace stating, 'It was thoughtful of you to enclose a copy of your book 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' and Her Majesty has noted your concerns'.
ALL,

A friend from facebook has made a video clip of the interview at;

Research on Babies and Toddlers Contact with Fathers

http://youtu.be/e7lOBHnZlcc

I think it is a little easier to hear.

kip

Kingsley Miller is the author of 'even Toddlers Need Fathers', a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in family courts, which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an, 'interesting and informative guide'. He has also received a letter from Buckingham Palace stating, 'It was thoughtful of you to enclose a copy of your book 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' and Her Majesty has noted your concerns'.
Kip - have you looked at Erikson's Theory of Environmental influences. I came across this nearly 20 years ago whilst at uni and think it might support our arguments.
ALL,

I have added references to the soundtrack of the audio interview. I hope this helps.

"Men Can't Nurse" say Australian Guidelines on contact for fathers from Dr Jennifer McIntosh - PART onE

http://youtu.be/WO2tC-TUsMs

"Men Can't Nurse" say Australian Guidelines on contact for fathers from Dr Jennifer McIntosh - PART TWO

http://youtu.be/InjMwNqg9oI

The reference to men can't nurse is in PART TWO at about ELEVEN minutes in reference to Dr Alan Sroufe.

Many thanks,

kip

LATE EDITE FROM ANOTHER THREAD:-

By Me_Dad,

Always glad to discuss Bowlby's work.

Pandering Feminist said
Kip, Bowlby himself corrected himself in 1988 (Secure Base) with regards to the theory of "Maternal Deprivation". Michael Rutter did not discredit Bowlby's work. In a video interview he said that he agreed more than disagreed. Both of them, Bowlby and Rutter, acknowledged that infants form attachment to any consistant caregiver who is sensitive and responsive in social interaction with the infant. The mother is usually (not always) the principal attachment figure but that role can be taken up by any person who acts "motherly" over a period of time when interacting with the infant. Nothing in the theory has ever suggested that fathers cannot be the principal caregiver.

It is rather people with hidden agendas that uses the theory, out of context, for personal gain, be it mothers or fathers or lawyers or courts orgovernments…….
I am sorry to say that Bowlby did not 'correct himself' as you put it, others had to do it for him. Indeed if he had not made a mistake there would be no need for any correction. Even so, I do not know whether you have followed the discussion with APRIL but I think we have established that in his original work Bowlby said fathers play 'second fiddle' and even towards the end of his career in 1986 when asked for his 'citation classic' (see below) he selected 'Maternal Care and Mental Health' because it 'focused attention on the mother's relationship with the young child as an important determinant sic of mental health'. He never accepted that fathers could be equally as important as mothers. (Unless you can cite such a quote).

I do not know whether you have followed the discussions so far but what I tend to find is that people make comments without watching the videos or reading the comments therefore do not fully grasp the arguments. So I think you maybe repeating what is the gist of my radio interview in which I say that Dr McIntosh is using the theory of 'maternal deprivation' for her own agenda. For example she has cited Dr Schore, nick-named the 'American Bowlby', because his work suggests that mothers have different brains to fathers (VIDEO - Dr Jennifer McIntosh and the Bowlby / Ainsworth Paradigm & VIDEO - Dr Jennifer McIntosh and the Neuroscience of Shared Parenting ) and Dr Alan Sroufe who says 'Men can't nurse' (VIDEO - Professor Alan Sroufe and Shared Parenting -Divorce and Attachment Relationships). In the radio programme I cite these examples from Dr McIntoshes own paper. (If you have seen these videos or looked at the journal already I apologise).

In the programme we ran out of time and I have made a couple of requests to go back and finish-up the 'maternal deprivation' angle. What I wanted to say is that my critics, for example APRIL, will argue that I blame Dr McIntosh for drawing false correlations and 'boot strapping' but that is exactly what I am doing!

That is the reason I wanted to end by quoting verbatim from the Family Justice Review journal interview with Daniel Siegel. In this special edition of the family law journal which she edited Dr McIntosh makes no bones about coming from a Bowlby tradition. In each of the interviews she promotes the idea of the single primary care giver, usually the mother. Most agree (because they come from a Bowlby tradition) but Dr Siegel, who is trained as a medical doctor and is a psychiatric professor, from a Rutter tradition, takes a different stance;

McIntosh: Questions that arise often in the family law arena include these: Can you have two
primary caregivers? Is there any evidence about the brains of mothers and fathers working any
differently over the care-giving tasks?

Siegel: Others may say no, you do not have two primary attachment figures, but I think you can over
time, within the same home. But those parents do different things. In divorce, having two primary
attachment figures is probably different. I am not the person to ask about the gender question, because
I have a peculiar aversion to gender-specific generalizations. I know there is neurobiological research
that demonstrates differences. I just cannot get myself to take those findings seriously because of my
own experience as a father, because of my own experience of my parents, because of my experience
as a therapist. Both men and women have deep potentials for caring for infants.

McIntosh: The gender issue is something I would like to dismiss too, but it is endemic to family law
and it perpetually rears its head in court decisions and influences policy directions.

Siegel: My understanding of attachment categories is that they are totally gender neutral. I know
people say women are more integrated because their corpus callosum is thicker. So what? That does
not mean you cannot have a loving relationship as a male with an infant. Now, we do have these things
called gender roles, where the male feels like he has to go out and earn money, and the female thinks
that she has to be at home. But I think that is a sociologically reinforced, perhaps genetically induced
tendency, but it does not have to be fixed at all. Ive seen plenty of fathers be unbelievable primary
caregivers, and the woman is out and about working. And the children do extremely well. Attachment
categories are gender-neutral.

McIntosh: If we could hose down the gender debate about attachment, then we might actually get
down to talking about the function of a primary caregiver: whether you are the mother or the father,
what is it that a primary attachment figure does to support optimal development? I see that as the
discussion that is most needed. Allan Schore talks about the importance of psychological gender and
the ability to fulfill the functions of the primary caregiver role: being nurturing, responsive, and a
secure base for comfort.

Siegel: Absolutely! I mean, if you outline the basics of a primary caregiver, you see how gender
neutral it is. The primary caregiver is someone who is tuned in to the internal experience of the child,
not just the childs behavior. That is the simplest way to say it. Males can do it, and females can do
it. And some females cannot do it, and some males cannot do it. It is really a matter of seeing the
internal world, not just managing behavior. And this reflective function can be taught: most can learn
to have mindsight enabling us to perceive our own and others internal worlds.
In this exchange Dr Siegel dismisses the neurobiological claims made by Dr Schore (PhD) as 'laughable' and whilst Dr Sroufe (PhD) says men can't nurse, he says 'My understanding of attachment categories is that they are totally gender neutral' and does not qualify the quote.

I wanted to conclude with this extract because it confirms the contents of my interview with Dads on the Air ie it is not just me citing Professor Sir Michael Rutter!

Of course Dr McIntosh does not refer to Dr Siegel because he does not agree with her view of child development. Instead she promotes the marginal views of Dr Schore and Dr Sroufe as mainstream.

Dr McIntoshes guidelines are based on a discredited and sexist view of child development and as such should disqualify her from any further involvement with the Attorney General's department because the law, including family law, should be impartial and objective.

I hope this is an accurate summary of the arguments.

Kingsley Miller kip


VIDEO - Dr Jennifer McIntosh and the Bowlby / Ainsworth Paradigm

http://youtu.be/rS8Jo3oJo-Y

VIDEO - Dr Jennifer McIntosh and the Neuroscience of Shared Parenting - Dr Allan Schore and Professor Daniel Siegel

http://youtu.be/rj56-vip6_Q

VIDEO - Professor Alan Sroufe and Shared Parenting -Divorce and Attachment Relationships

http://youtu.be/dmwRGE535YI

VIDEO - "Men Can't Nurse" say Australian Guidelines on contact for fathers from Dr Jennifer McIntosh - PART onE

http://youtu.be/WO2tC-TUsMs

VIDEO - "Men Can't Nurse" say Australian Guidelines on contact for fathers from Dr Jennifer McIntosh - PART TWO

http://youtu.be/InjMwNqg9oI

LINK - Maternal Care and Mental Health - This Week's Citation Classic DECEMBER15,1986. BowlbyJ.

http://garfield.library.upenn.edu/classics1986/A1986F062900001.pdf

Kingsley Miller is the author of 'even Toddlers Need Fathers', a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in family courts, which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an, 'interesting and informative guide'. He has also received a letter from Buckingham Palace stating, 'It was thoughtful of you to enclose a copy of your book 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' and Her Majesty has noted your concerns'.
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