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ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HELEN RHOADES Melbourne Law School University of Melbourne Australia

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HELEN RHOADES Melbourne Law School University of Melbourne Australia

All,

Can anybody tell me where I can see a copy of this online?

'Yearning for Law: Fathers' Groups and Family Law Reform in Australia' in R. Collier, S. Sheldon (ed),
Fathers' Rights Activism and Law Reform in Comparative Perspective (2006) 125-146.
by Associate Professor Helen Rhoades

Can anybody tell me more about this lady?

Is she friendly with Dr Jenn McIntosh?

Many thanks,

kip


Kingsley Miller is the author of 'even Toddlers Need Fathers', a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in family courts, which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an, 'interesting and informative guide'. He has also received a letter from Buckingham Palace stating, 'It was thoughtful of you to enclose a copy of your book 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' and Her Majesty has noted your concerns'.
From Austlii a Federal Law Review published by Rhoades after but including "Yearning for Law"

Rhoades, Helen — "The Dangers of Shared Care Legislation: Why Australia Needs (Yet More) Family Law Reform" [2008] FedLawRw 12; (2008) 36(3) Federal Law Review 279

"…I am indebted to Richard Chisholm, … I would also like to thank Belinda Fehlberg.. "

The article extensively references McIntosh's work and at note 7 refers to own work 'Yearning for Law: Fathers' Groups and Family Law Reform in Australia' in Sheldon and Collier (eds), above n 1, 125. Our own Michael Green gets a mention also.

Rhoades is a self-admitted feminist and socio-legal advocate from Melbourne University, retirement home of former chief tyrant of the Family Court Alistair Nicholoson, and 20 minutes from McIntosh HQ at La Trobe University. We're infested with 'em.


The Book 'Fathers' rights activism and law reform in comparative perspective' seems to available as an ebook
Formats and Editions of Fathers' rights activism and law reform in comparative perspective [WorldCat.org]
SRLDAD101,

Thank you for the kind posting. I am interested in her work because of the article below and would particularly like to see 'Yearning for Law: Fathers' Groups and Family Law Reform in Australia' in R. Collier, S. Sheldon (ed), Fathers' Rights Activism and Law Reform in Comparative Perspective (2006) 125-146. by Associate Professor Helen Rhoades. CAN ANYBODY HELP?

kip

PS I WOULD ALSO APPRECIATE ANY VIEWS ON THE ARTICLE!

John Howard parenting law finds favour in Britain by: Chip Le Grand The Australian January 09, 2012 12:00AM

Australian-based fathers groups, which are advising British counterparts, yesterday welcomed public comments from Britain's Minister for Children and Families Tim Loughton that his government was considering "legislative and non-legislative" means to promote shared parenting as part of a broad family law shake-up.

Mr Loughton also distanced himself from the recommendations of a government-commissioned review of family law that cited problems with the Howard government's 2006 reforms to argue against shared parenting legislation.

Lone Fathers Association of Australia president Barry Williams backed the British government stance, which goes against the key recommendation of the Family Justice Review chaired by businessman David Norgrove. In his final report published late last year, Mr Norgrove said "thorough and detailed evidence from Australia showed the damaging consequences for many children" when courts compelled them to spend equal time with both parents.

Elspeth McInnes, a policy adviser to the National Council of Single Mothers and their Children, said the direction of the British debate was "concerning" and based more on ideology than sound policy.

"There is lot of evidence in the UK that the laws as they currently stand are not able to protect children from ongoing exposure to abusive parents," Dr McInnes said. "If you have flaws in that system before you introduce shared parenting, introducing shared parenting is like pouring fuel on the flames.

"The system does not deal well with violence and abuse as it currently stands, either here in Australia or in the UK."

The Gillard government last year introduced further changes to the law following criticisms that in instances of family violence, the Howard government's Shared Parental Responsibility Act gave insufficient weight to child safety against the rights of parents, particularly fathers.

Among a series of recommendations for sweeping changes to British family law, Mr Norgrove warned against introducing legislation in Britain that implied a parental right to "substantially shared or equal time" with their children.

"Drawing on international and other evidence, we opposed legislation to encourage 'shared parenting,' " he said.

The final report included a detailed critique of Australia's shared parenting laws by Melbourne Law School associate professor Helen Rhoades that cited the complexity of the laws and differing interpretations by the courts.

Mr Loughton last week told London's Daily Telegraph his government "must do everything we can to improve the system so that it gives children the best chance of growing up under the guidance of two loving parents".

Last edit: by Kip


Kingsley Miller is the author of 'even Toddlers Need Fathers', a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in family courts, which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an, 'interesting and informative guide'. He has also received a letter from Buckingham Palace stating, 'It was thoughtful of you to enclose a copy of your book 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' and Her Majesty has noted your concerns'.
Kip

I just read the first few pages of Rhoade's article "Yearning for Law" from the link provided. One has to pay for more or it's free for affiliated UK academic institutions on EBSCO.

The problem with adopting John Howard's parenting laws is that they did f&ck all here - a 3% increase to 17% in court ordered shared parenting arrangements is statistically nothing.  

The lesson to be learned is how the Howard government was badly outmanoeuvred in its reform effort to gain bipartisan support and a few extra female votes. It watered down the presumption of equal shared parenting to shared parental responsibility with a statutory requirement of "must consider" equal time with both parents - which the judiciary easily ignored - AND a review of the legislation after 3 years.

Litigated divorce dropped 22% in the expectation that the Court would order shared parenting. However, the courts continued to find 83% of Australian fathers unfit to share in the parenting of their own children - using fatuous unchallengeable discretionary reasons such as the parents can't adequately communicate (meaning mum won't) or changeover lateness, …. - waiting for the REVIEW.

Labour had gambled that it would be in power by this time. The far Left needs divorce for votes & power, namely, 70% of unmarried/divorced women vote for welfare and social justice [wealth redistribution from the oppressive patriarchy to victim women].

Labour also knew that the in-progress independent AIFS review would not find any increase in family violence or child abuse due to the shared parenting reform - how could there be when there was no increase in shared parenting?

The AG opportunistically politicised the Darcy Freeman tragedy - which had nothing to do with court ordered shared parenting - to commission a new report by a former family court justice D?ck(head) Chisholm.

Chisholm had already revealed his anti-shared parenting fanaticism as co-author with Jenny McIntosh of  'Shared Care and Children's Best Interests in Conflicted Separation: A Cautionary Tale from Current Research' (2007) 20(1) Australian Family Lawyer. This academic paper found contraindications against shared care which prohibited shared care even in the marriage relationship. Of course the family court preferred McIntosh's study based on a simple size of 38 odd couples to 2000+ published, peer reviewed studies contradicting her findings.

Chisholm's review "surprisingly" found children were at risk of family violence because unknown victims are too afraid to make allegations. He recommended repealing the presumption of innocence and removal of penalties for perjury to protect the children.

Which run thru the Familylawyerscum Yammerbabble Translator (with callousness and sexism algorithms on medium) comes out as Listen d?ckhead, Howard's not in office, we are, here's an exparte AVO so hand over your house, kids and future income, shut up, pay your child support and die!

No one with even a sense of shame or smarts could come out with such a report, virtually a dictionary definition of biased stupidity, other than a former family court judge whose career is unchallenged palandering platitudes "in the best interests of the child".

The relevant point is that the UK political parties accept that Family Law reform is inevitable. Norgrove Report Dead, Shared Parenting Lives in UK
The "Australian experience" shows that the devil is in the details. Don't accept the compromised wording or review wriggle room we did or you will be in the same boat. I have noticed an export industry of Australian useful "academic" idiots to the UK recently. Family law-domestic violence is a multibillion pound industry. Only a presumption of equal shared care can reign in judicial indiscretion.

Regards the article and Prof Elspeth McInnes opinion expressed therein,
check the comments to her online opinion article published 16/11/2010
Proposed changes to Australias Family Law Act will better support childrens safety

"Radical ratbag feminism is alive & well, & thriving in our universities."

"I think if the author gets her 'safety first' legislation, it will require separated parents to undergo an amazing training regime to ensure they can run fast enough to get to the office first with their claims of violence.

Then they will hold all the cards in divorce proceedings while their partner fights off (In a prove god doesn't exist manner) the accusations, all the while holding custody of the kids.

What if one of the parents tears a hamstring? How will we test for performance enhancing drugs? The game shouldn't be so dependent on who wins the toss.

Unless you have enough resources to investigate fully all accusations (by police) within 2 weeks of them being made, with harsh consequences for false accusations, it's a non-starter"




 
While not the particular study you have asked for 'Reforming Custody Laws: A Comparitive Study. International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, Vol. 18, pp. 119-146, 2004' (Number 3 on the list from her Uni Melb website) co-authored by Susan Boyd who is the Chair in Feminist Legal Studies and Director, Centre for Feminist Legal Studies at the Uni of British Colombia, does have some discussion about family law reforms in both Canada and Australia with reference to Fathers Groups.  http://papers.ssrn.com...?per_id=94106#hide1170462


  

"Never, "for the sake of peace and quiet," deny your own experience or convictions". Dag Hammarskjold
I needed help with my case and couldn't afford a lawyer and found these guys invaluable  srl-resources.org
CrazyWorld,

This LINK to the pieces of research from Prof Rhoades is incredibly helpful.

From what I can tell the research paper from July 2008, The Family Law Reform Act 1995: The First Three Years by Helen Rhoades, Reg Graycar & Margaret Harrison, is one of the most biased pieces of research I have ever seen!

It probably is more responsible than any other for the opposition to Shared Parenting.

I think we have all focused so much on DR Jenn McIntosh this has been allowed to slip through the net.

Rhoades letter to the UK Norgrove Family Review is reprinted in full in the ANNEX!

Many thanks,

kip

Kingsley Miller is the author of 'even Toddlers Need Fathers', a critique of the principle of 'Maternal Deprivation' as applied in family courts, which Professor Sir Michael Rutter described as an, 'interesting and informative guide'. He has also received a letter from Buckingham Palace stating, 'It was thoughtful of you to enclose a copy of your book 'even Toddlers Need Fathers' and Her Majesty has noted your concerns'.
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