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Can husband's refusal to have children during a long marriage be considered a contribution by the wife to the marriage

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During a 27 year marriage husband refused to have children despite my desire to do so. He decided to leave me  just as I commenced menopause so I have now lost any opportunity to have children with another partner as well as the security of the marriage.  Would the Courts give this any weight in considering my contribution to the marriage above 50/50 ?

It seems unfair that by agreeing to this sacrifice he retains the opportunity to have children while i don't.  While I realise this probably leaves us both in a better position financially today and is probably an impossible sacrifice to value.  I feel like it should count for something - or am I just confusing justice with family law?
It is unjust, but I am not sure that it would hold any weight in a property settlement as it would be almost impossible to prove it was not a mutual decision.

If not through menopause and you really want a child it may be possible with artificial means, but a doctor would be your best avenue to discuss this and not for this forum.

This would not aid in any property settlement.

A very simple answer is no - it does not count in the court

Robyn said
During a 27 year marriage husband refused to have children despite my desire to do so.He decided to leave me just as I commenced menopause so I have now lost any opportunity to have children with another partner as well as the security of the marriage. Would the Courts give this any weight in consideringmy contribution to the marriageabove 50/50 ?

It seems unfair that by agreeing to this sacrificeheretains the opportunitytohave children while i don't. While I realise this probably leaves us both in a better position financially today and is probably an impossible sacrifice to value. I feel like it should count for something - or am I just confusing justice with family law?
Interesting question from a legal point of view.

A very simple answer is no - it does not count in the court… unless you could show a form of mental abuse.

However, I do not think you have grounds in this case.

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