Donate Child Support Calculator
Skip navigation

Call for Grandparents to respond now

A new Australian Study of Grandparents with Grandchildren whose Parents have Separated. Grandparents of children aged between 2-10 years whose parents separated between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2008 are invited to participate in a survey being condu

An Australian Study of Grandparents with Grandchildren whose Parents have Separated

This study focuses on the impact that parental separation has upon the relationship grandparents have with their grandchildren.

The results will inform the Evaluation of the Family Law Reforms currently being undertaken by the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) on behalf of the Australian Government.

We are focusing on grandparents who have a biological or adopted adult child who is both a parent and separated.

National Survey of Grandparents in Australia


Grandparents of children aged between 2-10 years whose parents separated between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2008 are invited to participate in a survey being conducted by the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS).

Your answers will be kept strictly confidential by AIFS and there is no need to provide any contact details.

The national online survey runs until the 25th of July 2009 and will take under 10 minutes to complete.

If you have a grandchild aged 2-10 years whose parents separated between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2008, we invite you to complete the online questionnaire.
Please note: The survey site is hosted by a third party which undertakes to keep data private and secure. However as AIFS is not responsible for the privacy practices of that third party, we encourage you to examine their website privacy policy.

What is the AIFS all about?

Other Government Grandparent resources
SPCA recommended reference for Grandparents… An authoritative paper Grandparents Family Law Information Guide

So grandparents can and should do something about it if they are being deliberately alienated from their grandchildren. The cases indicate that the less hostility there is, the better. Grandparents get much less support if they are causing disruption and disharmony to their grandchildren's lives, however justified their anger may be. Generally grandparents are expected to see their grandchildren at the same time as their own chid has contact. However, if there are special circumstances, or if their child won't or can't seek contact, or if their own child is the problem, then grandparents can bring action. Probably the grandparents need to do the travelling and incur the expense and should try and fit in their contact with the parents' and certainly the child's convenience as much as possible.

Executive Secretary - Shared Parenting Council of Australia
 Was my post helpful? If so, please let others know about the FamilyLawWebGuide whenever you see the opportunity
 
We are currently investigating a possible problem with completing the survey . Please review the image

295 views (22 KB)






Executive Secretary - Shared Parenting Council of Australia
 Was my post helpful? If so, please let others know about the FamilyLawWebGuide whenever you see the opportunity
 
In line with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the 2006 reforms to the Family Law Act 1975 require decisions to be made in the 'best interest of the child'.  By recognising the important role grandparents (and other relatives) play in children's lives, the reforms reflect Article 8 of the Convention, in which 'family relations' are considered essential to a child's identity.  

However, the 2006 reforms DO NOT consider the rights and best interests of ALL Australian children.  When determining whether a child can have access to his/her grandparent/s, courts consider the nature of the pre-existing relationship between the child and his/her grandparent/s and the likely effect on the child of separation from those grandparent/s.

THIS DISCRIMINATES against children (and their grandparents) whose parents have denied them from ever knowing or having contact with their grandparents.  

The Australian Government in now commissioning the Australian Institute of Family Studies in "A call to Grandparents" to participate in an important new research project in studying the impact on Grandparents and Grandchildren of separated parents in connection with family law reforms involves only Grandparents of grandchildren whose parents have separated, and not Grandparents of grandchildren whose parents have not separated.

This is discriminatory. The research will not represent a true reflection of the status of Grandparents and Grandchildren in general. It will further contribute flaws to an already unjust family law system.

This is discrimination to all Grandparents and Grandchildren who have been and, or are denied contact by parents who have not separated but who deny their own children from knowing their grandparents and extended family for no plausible reason.
 
To ensure NO child (or Grandparent) is discriminated against, Family Law Legislation needs to be CHANGED to:

1.   Specifically recognise the rights and best interest of ALL Australian children to know and have contact with their grandparents, whether they have had a pre-existing relationship or not, unless there is evidence of danger to the child, and regardless of whether the parents are separated or not

2.   Reduce the financial burden on grandparents who are denied contact with their grandchildren and who wish to apply to the Court to spend time with their grandchildren.

3.   Improve the professional training of lawyers, judges, mediators and counsellors regarding the rights of, and benefits to, children knowing and having contact with their grandparents (and other relatives).


Grandparents & Grandchildren contact lobby



First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.  M K Gandhi
1 guest and 0 members have just viewed this.

Recent Tweets