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More anti-father advocacy 'research' and 'reporting'

Many divorced women say they are no worse off than before the break-up, or are even a bit better off...

Adele Horin really hates separated fathers (and men in general).

This the message the Federal Government, and many others, want to hear; in their minds it justifies them playing Robin Hood and continuing to systematically and institutionally (via the CSA) steal from men to pay women - just one big State Pimp!

Apparently, from this report, this AIFS study only looked at income but didn't take into account loss of substantive property and assets, such as a house, and future retirement superannuation, that is often diminished by State-sanctioned theft, enforced by State Courts.

Even when admitting other factors are involved, the AIFS cannot resist sinking the boots in and negatively characterising separated fathers as privileged in relation to women.
The Institute's deputy director and lead author of the study, Matthew Gray, said the men's perceptions in part might reflect the overall quality of their life post-divorce. "They might have more money, but many used to have someone doing the cooking and cleaning and organising the social life, and some are alienated and angry because they don't live with their children," Dr Gray said. "And a lot of men really don't want to pay child support."
If this is an example of the 'quality' of the 'research from the AIFS, then woe betide us when they release their end of 2009 report of family law changes since 2006.  Expect it to be feminist advocacy 'research'.

Elsewhere it was noted


Adele Horin gets it half-right again. She then typically wrongly goes off on a tangent to justify her agenda.
 
Horin leads the reader to believe that divorce is a contributing factor. Is it a contributing factor for both men and women?
 
In a small notation to her table (which most people would miss) Horin refers to just "the poor" and "very poor" categories in the HILDA tables. There are six categories - prosperous, very comfortable, reasonably comfortable, just getting along, poor and very poor. Horin does not include the other four categories.

ERROR: A link was posted here (url) but it appears to be a broken link.
http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/hilda/Biblio/ophd/Hamilton_Barbato_Australians%20will%20never%20be%20prosperous.pdf

Horin also does not provide any criteria for the figures that she has provided - "divorced but not remarried", "divorced but remarried" "single never married", etc. The outcomes are different in each case.

Horin also fails to add that the authors have previously stated that divorce had no effect on the financial outcome for women.

Horin also fails to add that her authors state that men are far worse off after divorce.

http://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/pubs/rp38/rp38.html

In an article by David de Vaus, Matthew Gray, Lixia Qu and David Stanton "Divorce and personal wellbeing of older Australians", it states that

For men, the divorced and remarried are more likely to report having experienced financial hardship than the married never-divorced, but less likely than the divorced and single. For women, no difference in the rates of experiencing financial hardship were found between the divorced and remarried and the married never-divorced.

The outcomes are again very different to that inferred by Horin.

In her article below, Horin then merely says

Yet many divorced women say they are no worse off than before the break-up, or are even a bit better off, possibly because they can now have more control over the finances, the study shows.

A very devious journalist!

Divorced men better off but not happier

The Sydney Morning Herald
8 July 2009

Divorced men better off but not happier
By Adele Horin

Four years after a marriage break-up divorced men are significantly better off than divorced women - and better off than before the separation. But the men are much more likely than the women to cry poor, a study has found.

Women suffer a considerable financial penalty for years after they divorce and, on objective measures, such as ability to pay bills on time, almost half would be considered struggling.

Yet many divorced women say they are no worse off than before the break-up, or are even a bit better off, possibly because they can now have more control over the finances, the study shows.

The research, by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, says that over the five years of economic prosperity to 2007 the incomes of divorced fathers with children under 18 rose 24 per cent, adjusted for family size, while divorced mothers' income rose on average only 1.8 per cent. The divorced men's income rose even faster than that of fathers who stayed married.

The divorced men's average incomes were $33,356 after they had paid child support, while the mothers' incomes averaged $26,512 after they had received child support. Yet while the fathers reported feeling more prosperous than when married, 9.7 per cent regarded themselves as poor or very poor four years after the divorce, compared with 4 per cent of the mothers.

Matthew Gray, the institute's deputy director, and lead author of the study, said the men's perceptions in part might reflect the overall quality of their life after divorce.

"They might have more money but many used to have someone doing the cooking and cleaning and organising the social life, and some are alienated and angry because they don't live with their children. And a lot of men really don't want to pay child support."

And it was poorer couples who tended to divorce so both were starting their new lives from a low-income base. As a result, 42 per cent of divorced fathers experienced one incident of extreme financial hardship in a 12-month period compared with 19 per cent of non-divorced men. But an even higher proportion of divorced mothers, 48 per cent, reported such hardship.

The study draws on the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey that since 2001 has followed an initial sample of 14,000 people. It has tracked couples from before divorce through the years after separation, and compared their circumstances with those who did not divorce.

The paper will be presented at the Australian Social Policy conference at the University of NSW today. It found divorce had a substantial impact on women's incomes, and almost none on men's, after adjusting for family size. About 88 per cent of the mothers had children living with them most of the time.

Changes to the child support formula have meant fathers on average pay a little less child support and, in the case of wealthy fathers, much less. But Dr Gray said child support was intended to reflect the cost of raising children, not to be a spousal maintenance payment.

The study showed that almost half the divorced women whose income fell by more than $4000 over a year reported feeling as well off as before the separation. Nearly 13 per cent said they were better off.

Dr Gray said the women who fared better had some involvement in managing household finances before the separation, and had probably gained a realistic insight into the financial struggles ahead, and could manage better.


Table: The research found divorced men's income rose even faster than the fathers who stayed married.


Divorced men cry poor but better off than women

The Age (Melbourne)
8 July 2009

Divorced men cry poor but better off than women
By Adele Horin

Four years after a marriage break-up, divorced men are significantly better off than divorced women and better off than before the separation. But the men are much more likely than the women to cry poor.

A path-breaking study reveals that women suffer a considerable financial penalty for years after they divorce, and on objective measures, such as ability to pay bills on time, almost half would be considered struggling.

Yet many divorced women say they are no worse off than before the break-up, or are even a bit better off, possibly because they have more control over finances, the study shows.

The research, by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, reveals that over the five years of economic prosperity to 2007, the incomes of divorced fathers with children under 18 rose 24 per cent, adjusted for family size, while divorced mothers' income rose on average only 1.8 per cent. The divorced men's income rose even faster than that of fathers who stayed married over that period.

The divorced men had an average income of $33,356 after they had paid child support, while the mothers had an income of $26,512 after they had received child support. Yet while the divorced fathers reported feeling more prosperous than when married, 9.7 per cent of them regarded themselves as poor or very poor four years after the divorce compared with 4 per cent of the mothers.

The Institute's deputy director and lead author of the study, Matthew Gray, said the men's perceptions in part might reflect the overall quality of their life post-divorce.

"They might have more money, but many used to have someone doing the cooking and cleaning and organising the social life, and some are alienated and angry because they don't live with their children," Dr Gray said. "And a lot of men really don't want to pay child support."

As well, it was poorer couples who tended to divorce, so both men and women were starting their new life from a low income base. As a result, 42 per cent of divorced fathers experienced one incident of extreme financial hardship over a 12-month period compared with 19 per cent of non-divorced men. But an even greater proportion of divorced mothers 48 per cent reported such hardship incidents.

The study draws on the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey that, since 2001, has followed an initial sample of 14,000 people over time. It was able to track couples from before they divorced through the post-separation years, and also to compare their circumstances with those who did not divorce.

The paper, with David de Vaus, Lixia Qu and David Stanton, will be presented at the Australian Social Policy conference at the University of NSW today.

It found about 88 per cent of the mothers had children living with them for most of the time.

The study showed that almost half the divorced women who suffered a significant fall in income over a year by more than $4000 reported feeling as well off as before the separation and nearly 13 per cent said they were better off.

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