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Dissapointed in COA

In short I'm utterly confused. I got a COA .. I have %58 of the care, have to pay %61 of costs. IN the letter there is no mention of what these costs are or how I am meant to pay?

This will probably be a bit ranty.. sorry.

From a phone call on Friday i received my new COA .. WEEEEEEE

In short I'm utterly confused.  I got a COA .. I have %58 of the care, have to pay %61 of costs.  IN the letter there is no mention of what these costs are or how I am meant to pay?

As stated to CSA I pay all Sons School and Medical and Extra circular .. but apparantly this doesn't count as "meeting the costs of a child"

Also I have 2 other children - they offset me as $5130  combined but S has a direct cost of $4303 - surely the cost of a child should be same?

I looked into "reason 8" and had the paperwork sent to me, but the paperwork does not match legislation which is quite clear on parents who can work but choose not to under "Capacity to earn" - The paper work for Reason 8 doesn't allow this to be entered.

Not sure if anyone can help or explain this to me , frankly "because that's the formula" doesn't work for me

I still believe she is on fradulent benifits (disability, perhaps single mother) - she is neither. CSA won't get off their ass to check anything, I am wondering if I can use FIO to legal gather what benefits she is on?)

Last edit: by KTH

KTH said
Also I have 2 other children - they offset me as $5130  combined but S has a direct cost of $4303 - surely the cost of a child should be same?

If the two other children are what are classed as relevant dependants (i.e. the other parent isn't also a parent of the two children), then the cost of those children is based upon your ATI (adjusted taxable income less the self support amount) only, the resultant cost of those children then acts to reduce your child support income (your child support income is your ATI less deductions such as relevant depenant child amout and multicase alowance and the self support amount), the same is done for the other parent and then the two child support incomes are added together to form the combined child support income.

It is the combined child support income that is then used to determine the cost of the CS children. Thus there will always be a difference (except if the parent with the relevant dependants has an income less than the child support amount where the cost of the relevant dependants will always be 0).

I've assumed that by other children you mean RDC's. Here's an example :-

A and B have a child X (under 13 in this example). A has a taxable income of 50,000. B has a taxable income of 30,000. A has two other children from the relationship he is currently in (both under 13). A has 210 nights care of X (58%).


For parent A, the $50,000 is reduced by $18,808 (Self Support Amount) thus at this stage A's child support income is $31,192
As A has two relevant dependant children the $31,192 is applied to the cost of children table, the resultant cost of those two children is $7,456, this further reduces A's child support income to $23,736.

For parent B, the $30,000 is reduced by $18808, there is no relevant dependant child amount, so that parent's child support income is $11,192.

The combined child support income is $23,736 + $11,192 = $34,928

This amount is applied to the cost of children table, for 1 child with a result of $5803.

Each parents income percentage is then calculated (i.e. the percentage they input to the combined child support income), this is 67.96% for A and 32.04% for B.

Each parent's cost percentage is then worked out.

For A (58% care) it is 51% + 2% for every 1% over 53% (this apples for the care in the range from 51% to 65%).
51 + (2 * (58-53))
= 51 + (2 * 5)
= 51 + 10
= 61%

For B (42%) it is 25% + 2% for every 1% over 35% (this applies for care in the range from 35%  to 47%)
25 + (2 * 42-35))
= 25 + (2 * 7)
= 25 + 14
= 39%

The cost percentages added will always be 100%.


Each parents income percentage is then reduced by the cost percentage (if this is 0 or less, which it will be for one parent, then that parent will not pay CS)
For A it is 67.96% - 61% = 6.96%
For B it is 32.04% - 39% -6.96%


Last the paying parent (the one with the positive income percentage) will pay that percentage of the cost of the children.

Note the above is simplified as costs are worked out on a per child basis to allow diferent levels of care of CS children to be taken into consideration.

Sorry if this confuses you more, however in regard to the 58% equating to 61% of costs, actually with 58% of care, those (Prof Parkinson I believe) that worked out the cost percentages, deemed that with 58% of the the care, the cost of that care should equate to paying 61% of the costs and thus why 61% is subtracted in the formula.

Here's what the CSA Guide says about Cost Percentage :-

The CSA Guide - 2.4.5 said
Cost percentage

A parents cost percentage represents the percentage of a childs costs the person meets directly through care. A non-parent carers cost percentage is used to calculate their entitlement to receive child support. The cost percentage is determined according to the persons percentage of care, using the cost percentages table (section 55C).

Percentage of Care
   

Cost percentage

0 to less than 14%    : Nil

14% to less than 35%   : 24%

35% to less than 48%   : 25% plus 2% for each percentage point over 35%
48% to 52%            : 50%

more than 52% to 65%  : 51% plus 2% for each percentage over 53%

more than 65% to 86%  : 76%

more than 86% to 100% : 100%


Examples

A percentage of care of 11% equates to a cost percentage of 0%

A percentage of care of 19% equates to a cost percentage of 24%

A percentage of care of 40% equates to a cost percentage of 35%

A percentage of care of 50% equates to a cost percentage of 50%

A percentage of care of 81% equates to a cost percentage of 76%

A percentage of care of 88% equates to a cost percentage of 100%
KTH - It's amazing that you have majority care and you still have to pay child support to the ex simply because you earn more. This is not child support. More like spousal maintenance. Object to the decision and take it to the SSAT and or court and see what they say - You have nothing to lose.
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